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Category Archives: school fundraising

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We’ve been doing a lot of work in schools. Find out how students use technology here or 7 things you need to know about fundraising in schools here.

We’re also interested in what rewards it would would take to get teenage students to start a giving habit and save £1 a week for a whole term for a cause they cared about.

We asked 250 secondary students in 10 schools about the idea of a weekly giving club.

blog - schools - giving club v2

Let’s talk about the rewards …

We then got to the fun stuff, the rewards you might expect for sustained effort.

We asked what rewards you would most like or dislike in return for your class being asked to save £1 a week for a term.  Group rewards and shared social experiences leapt to the top of the league and divisive prizes which penalised laggards produced noticeable negative reactions.

Motivation Like it a lot or like it a little I don’t like this
Q24 – The whole class goes on a day trip to visit the people helped by the money you raised. 75% 2% 
Q25 – Every student who manages to save £1 a week for a whole term gets a voucher for Amazon to spend how they like. People who don’t reach the target don’t get a voucher 52% 14% 
Q26 – If 90% of the class manage to save £1 a week for the whole term, the school gets £200 to spend on new equipment or books for your classroom. 62% 9% 
Q27 –  Some students decide to save more than £1 per week and the 5 students raising the most are given tickets to a music concert at Wembley. 73% 10%
Q28 – If 90% of the class manage to save £1 a week for the whole term the class teacher is given a reward worth £30. 59% 16%
Q29 – Every student who saves £1 every week for a whole term wins a ticket to a concert and a free ticket to take a friend. People who don’t reach their target don’t get a voucher. 69% 15%
Q30 – If all of your class manage to donate something, at the end of term the whole class is given a tray of Krispy Kreme to share. 61% 5%

Want to know students use tech? Read here.

Here’s 7 things you should know about schools fundraising.

If your charity is thinking about developing a new strategy or fundraising product for schools and would like help with researching, developing or testing it get in touch: change@thegivinglab.org

grange hill

Remember this lot?

Over the last year TheGivingLab has worked with over 300 students and their parents and teachers from schools of all types in London, Manchester and Newcastle to understand whether fundraising in schools still looks like Grange Hill, or whether it’s gone digital.

Here’s how teenagers told us they were using tech

blog - school - teen use of tech

blog - schools - teen use of social media

If students are digital, why isn’t schools fundraising digital?

In a lot of schools, fundraising might well be familiar to Tucker and the gang and their 1970’s fundraising efforts at Grange Hill. Things are changing, but schools are complex eco-systems and several key themes came up again and again which prevent fundraising taking advantage of digital innovation at every stage.

  • Many students have access to digital tech, but don’t use it often to pay or donate (especially mobile). Parents and students are wary of mobile payment, worrying about unexplained or unexpected costs.
  • Most schools are fighting to stop students using mobiles in school time and don’t want to encourage their use at any point, even for creating content or spreading the word.
  • For many teachers collecting cash is just easier than creating an online account, logging on and checking who has paid. So cash giving remains king.
  • Most schools have restricted internet access, which makes accessing new online services difficult for many schools, with individual teachers having to apply to have sites unblocked.
  • Many (often older) teachers didn’t feel comfortable with social media and other online technologies and felt unsure about using digital technology in the classroom.

Want to know what rewards motivate students? Read here.

Here’s 7 things you should know about schools fundraising.

If your charity is thinking about developing a new strategy or fundraising product for schools and would like help with researching, developing or testing it get in touch: change@thegivinglab.org

kids

We’ve worked with over 250 students, teachers and parents recently to understand fundraising in secondary schools, how it works and where digital fits in.

…  if you’re thinking about school fundraisng, here’s 7 things you need to know

  • Schools raise an average of £350-400 per event
  • Schools run an average of 2-3 fundraising events a year.
  • Teachers decide which charities to support – they decide whether schools do charity events and if so what, how and when.. (And parents didn’t have much or any say in the choice of charity a school raised money for in the majorityof cases)
  • Teachers prefer paper. The majority still prefer paper communications, but with a minority (of younger) teachers starting to prefer email communications
  • The majority of fundraising events are fun breaks from the educational curriculum, 78% of activities happen outside of lesson time and are dominated by fun events (non-uniform days, cake sales).
  • Non-digital methods of giving dominate – 25% of income was collected digitally in our ‘digital’ schools experiment and 75% was good old fashioned cash which went to the school bursar. Parents and students are wary of giving online and by mobile. Teachers and parents prefer cash to hand in at registration as it is simpler and quicker.
  • It’s a competitive marketplace with every major charity, many local charities and others competiting for schools attention. Comic Relief and Children in Need dominate schools fundraising activities.

Want to know students use technology? Read more here.

Want to know what rewards motivate students? Read more here.

If your charity is thinking about developing a new strategy or fundraising product for schools and would like help with researching, developing or testing it get in touch: change@thegivinglab.org